Who is your Customer Now?

During a conversation yesterday with one of our networking contacts (not even a prospect, really, just a helpful contact who shared some useful information about his organization and how it’s, well, organized), Megann listened carefully to a map of how the contact’s workplace functions, and with a few well-placed probes like:

  • “Who makes this kind of decision?”
  • “Who uses this sort of information?”
  • “How does your new role compare to your old role?”

…she was able to get a much richer understanding of this fellow’s world. Because we spend the vast majority of our time thinking about prospects and customers (how to find them, get them, talk to them, and keep them), we’ve learned that everyone has customers of some sort. Maybe not the traditional customers who go to a retailer for everything from a quick transaction to a lifestyle experience. And maybe not the kind that write contracts for delivery of goods and services at an enterprise level. But if we think of customers in terms of customer service, each of us, in our business lives, serves someone. That someone is a customer. Just like that, the right question was formulated.

“I know your role has changed and you’re not responsible for customer insights as you once were, but who is your customer now?”

Asking our contact to frame his activities from a specific viewpoint made it possible to get a great understanding of how he relates to his organization’s stakeholders, and what kind of information he might have, or need, at a later time. So the next time you need to understand someone who thinks they don’t have customers, ask them to:

  1. Think about who they serve with what they do.
  2. Describe that individual as their customer.
  3. Tell you about what they do with, and for, that customer.

We’re fairly certain you will gain a richer understanding of how that contact’s world works.

Customer discovery. It’s everywhere.

We’re asking – and listening,

Megann and Steve

Want to hear more? Get in touch via our website, or meet us at an upcoming event, like Invest Atlantic, or ProductCamp Atlantic.

To Drive Customer Understanding in your Company, Get Yourself in Gear

Tools to understand your customer better are proliferating exponentially. Along with time-tested methods such as telephone and internet surveys, or face-to-face groups, software and social media have made it possible to listen in on conversations in a variety of ways. But simply asking and listening isn’t enough.

Last time, we talked about the importance of making research interesting, engaging, and dare we say, entertaining for the buyers or users of your product. We’ve also discussed how no amount of data is a substitute for understanding and interpretation. Another important aspect of getting to know your customer on a personal, relationship level is to engage yourself in the process. That means not simply firing off surveys and waiting for the results. Nor does it involve just asking a consultant to scan what the world is saying about your brand, using text analytics, geocoding, or a host of other tools to come back with a result.

Getting involved with your customer means more work for you. It’s as easy as that. Just like meeting an attractive other person, getting them to go on a date with you isn’t a single step. You need to make an effort. The other person will know. You’ll know. And your effort and engagement in the process will make a difference. Being stand-offish or distancing yourself is a sure-fire path to failure. So the next time you want to get to know your customer (or even your prospect) a little better, get yourself in gear. A few ways you can do that include:

  1. Front-end planning, with a backup (know what you want to do with what you learn, before you start – and have a bailout plan in case new information calls for a change of plans).
  2. Flexible methodologies (even if your process seemed like the right one, if the customer isn’t interested in responding, you have to adapt – to paraphrase one of our trusted partners, just because you have a hammer, why are you assuming everything is a nail?).
  3. Triangulation (verify and validate by considering the questions, and the answers, from multiple perspectives – you’ll get a richer, deeper understanding).
  4. Rewarding interaction – (conditioner removes tangles when combined with careful combing; social conditioning such as revealing more about yourself, taking time to listen to the other person, and offering an appealing, appropriate incentive will help lubricate the conversation).

Untangling the threads,

Megann and Steve